in

Love ItLove It

Choosing a camera Part II

Yesterday I talked about the first part of my picking a camera guide. There are many cameras available now on the market and getting the right camera can make all the difference. One of the things we always have to consider is cost. If the camera costs too much you will not get the value from the camera. That said, if the camera is someone you intend to use all the time, then the cost basis of the camera should be considered differently.

Coast basis is the net cost to you.

The net cost of a camera ultimately is what will it cost you to take a picture. But there are factors to consider as well. If the camera costs 300 dollars and you can take 10,000 pictures with the camera without repairs or other costs, then the costs basis of the camera is 0.03 cents per picture (US). If the cost of the camera, I more than your cost basis goes up.

•Do you need to take underwater pictures?

•Do you need a fast on camera?

•Do you need a camera that has pre-built scenes or shots?

•The other thing to consider is doing you drop cameras. I know I do, so a camera that survives a fall is also important.

•The last thing is done; you need a high-speed shutter.

•Do you take many kinds of pictures (Macro, long-distance) and need a DSLR or SLR camera?

Many cameras today cover many of the features listed. Most cell phone cameras can do a lot of these functions as well. The most expensive cameras today are the DSLR’s, but honestly I have my fathers SLRs that are more than 45 years old, and they still work today. DSLR’s last longer than point and shoot and cell phone cameras do.

So first consider the cost basis. How much can you spend? Then start considering the functionality that you need and how you will use the camera.

For many people the cell phone is an awesome camera. The cost basis of pictures is low, and you already have one! You won’t most likely be able to drop it, and sometimes if you are on the phone, it becomes hard to take pictures as well.

So, part II – consider what you can spend. Consider what functionality you need.

More to come in Part III.

  • Would an explanation of 360 degree cameras be useful?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Would explanations of each of the different camera types help?

    • Yes
    • No
  • 3d versus 360 a discussion and comparision, would that be useful?

    • Yes
    • No
  • I don’t use film cameras. do you still use film?

    • Yes
    • No

What do you think?

21 points
Legend

Written by DocAndersen

I am a long time blogger and technology poster.I focus on what is possible, but I also try to see what is coming. In recent years I have been focused on sharing the memories of my family, as part of my Family History Project.

35 Comments

Leave a Reply
  1. Q: Would an explanation of 360 degree cameras be useful?
    Yes (4 votes) – 50%
    No (4 votes) – 50%
    Q: Would explanations of each of the different camera types help?
    Yes (4 votes) – 50%
    No (4 votes) – 50%
    Q: 3d versus 360 a discussion and comparision, would that be useful?
    Yes (6 votes) – 75%
    No (2 votes) – 25%
    Q: I don’t use film cameras. do you still use film?
    Yes (2 votes) – 25%
    No (6 votes) – 75%

    • May I ask which Olympus? I have the TG-4, I got the TG back when my kids were little and wanted to take pictures (it can be dropped, is waterproof etc)/

      I love that camera, Now, even though the kids are older, i still use the Olympus!!

  2. I used to love film-based cameras. I enjoyed looking at the film and trying to make out who is who. When I’m defeated, I would look at the original photo. I miss them.
    I would love if you would cover the poll questions you raised. I don’t know much about them.

Leave a Reply