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Quiz: American or British Spelling – Can you tell the difference? (Part 2)

This quiz is simple. I give you a word and you decide if it’s typical American spelling, or British, or universal. What could be easier? Find out now!

This is part 2 of this quiz; if you would like to play Part 1, it is here.

If you like this quiz, be sure to check out my more than 100 Amazing Quizzes on a Wide Variety of Topics! – “Guaranteed to make you smarter!”

  • Question of

    Kilometer – is it…

    • American spelling
    • British spelling
    • Universal spelling
  • Question of

    Organise

    • American
    • British
    • Universal
  • Question of

    Laborious

    • American
    • British
    • Universal
  • Question of

    Speciality

    • American
    • British
    • Universal
  • Question of

    Downhill

    • American
    • British
    • Universal
  • Question of

    Modeling

    • American
    • British
    • Universal
  • Question of

    Complected

    • American
    • British
    • Universal
  • Question of

    Gaol

    • American
    • British
    • Universal
  • Question of

    Ax

    • American
    • British
    • Universal
  • Question of

    Donut

    • American
    • British
    • Universal
  • Question of

    Storeys

    • American
    • British
    • Universal
  • Question of

    Thermometer

    • American
    • British
    • Universal

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What do you think?

24 points

27 Comments

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    • That’s interesting about complected. I had never heard it before researching the quiz. Here’s what MW says:
      “Not an error, nor a dialectal term, nor nonstandard—all of which it has been labeled—complected still manages to raise hackles. It is an Americanism, almost nonexistent in British English. Its currency in American English is attested as early as 1806 (by Meriwether Lewis) and it appears in the works of such notable American writers as Mark Twain, O. Henry, James Whitcomb Riley, and William Faulkner. The synonym complexioned, recommended by handbooks, appears now to be somewhat more common than complected in both literary and journalistic use.”

      2
  1. Got 6 right even though I got my university education in the States, and elementary and secondary education in Malaysia which uses British spelling. I guess it’s because most of my generation got our university education in the States that American spelling is now accepted everwhere (except at school) that we forgot which is British and which is American.

    1
    • I didn’t know it either before researching the quiz. Here’s what MW says:
      “Not an error, nor a dialectal term, nor nonstandard—all of which it has been labeled—complected still manages to raise hackles. It is an Americanism, almost nonexistent in British English. Its currency in American English is attested as early as 1806 (by Meriwether Lewis) and it appears in the works of such notable American writers as Mark Twain, O. Henry, James Whitcomb Riley, and William Faulkner. The synonym complexioned, recommended by handbooks, appears now to be somewhat more common than complected in both literary and journalistic use.”

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