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Watering The Tomb ~ Thursday Reflection.

This is another picture that I have prepared to share at Thursday Reflection that I took while visiting my father’s grave after Easter.  The two buckets filled with water were part of routine activities which could be said to be our “ritual” every time we visited the tomb.

Usually, the series of activities begins by asking that the tomb guards wash granite gravel to be clean of dried flower remnants, dry grass, dust, and weeds. After that, we will flatten or tidy up the pebbles again and put flowers, both bouquet and sprinkled flowers.  After that, all of those present, alternating from the oldest to the youngest, will pour water on all parts of the tomb. After those activities, we all will pray, according to our respective religions.

Watering the tomb is actually meaning more than just cleaning the whole tomb, but as a symbol to “cool” (occupants of) the tomb and also water it with prayer. The two buckets of water you see here were water that the tomb guards had prepared to pour on the tomb.  At certain events, the water used is rose water.

  • Are there certain kinds of rituals in your country when visiting tombs?

    • Yes
    • No
  • If yes, are there certain symbols from some or all of the activities of visiting the tomb that you did?

    • Yes
    • No

What do you think?

16 points

46 Comments

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  1. Users voted 13 times.
    Q: Are there certain kinds of rituals in your country when visiting tombs?

    Yes (9 votes) – 64%
    No (5 votes) – 36%

    Q: If yes, are there certain symbols from some or all of the activities of visiting the tomb that you did?

    Yes (5 votes) – 42%
    No (7 votes) – 58%

  2. I have to speak for my family traditions here. We go along with the wishes of the person. Generally cremation, and Mum’s ashes are placed in Manukau gardens. We put fake flowers that look nice there with herself and Dad in a photo.
    Not sure what the rest of my family do but whenever I visit I clean up and before I leave I always wash my hands, yes and always say a prayer.

  3. Users voted 9 times.
    Q: Are there certain kinds of rituals in your country when visiting tombs?

    Yes (6 votes) – 60%
    No (4 votes) – 40%

    Q: If yes, are there certain symbols from some or all of the activities of visiting the tomb that you did?

    Yes (3 votes) – 33%
    No (6 votes) – 67%

    • There is nothing I need to argue about what you feel for I understand it and agree, but considering we live in a big game with a variety of small games in it, then we must come into play in the various games too and follow the rules of the game, and that is our huge integrated attachment area. I’m sure you know where is the place of our true freedom.

  4. We must prepare food, fruits and beverage of the deceased and the “di zhu” (“owner of the land”, probably a “god” or guardian?). Flowers are not as important for us.
    We’ll clear the weeds around/on the tomb and then reapply the paint if they’re fading. Then we pray with joss sticks if our religion allows.

    At some places we burn paper money.

  5. I struggle with the tombs of the past.

    Are they memorials to the life that was. Or reminders that the stone replaced the person? I remember the person differently I guess.
    I did find your ceremony to be one of honor. Just not for me my friend.

  6. This would be nice to have at our cemeteries. We are often looking for water to wash the headstones. I always leave flowers for my family and I sit and talk to them. Wish I could visit more often. The drive is six hours away.

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