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Innovation continued…

Innovation conversations happen all the time. The newest in the television/media space is that of Virtual Reality. The potential in the VR world is amazing. The changes that VR will give several industries are amazing. Simply building out 3d models using VR devices will change several home 3d projects. Today as the 3d scanning market begins to expand you are limited to viewing a 2d image of your 3d scan. Going forward adding the VR capability you will be able to view your scans in 3d. This opens doors for parts builders (seeing the part in all views), but it also opens up the potential for many more solutions. Doctors would be able to see a 3d scan of the liver and examine it from every side. Or a tumor could be evaluated from every angle. An object in a person’s suitcase could be examined from all sides without opening the suitcase. The potential for just those professionals (Medical, Law Enforcement) are incredible, and that is only the surface. Home builders are another group that will benefit from VR and 3d. Both being able to quickly print a physical house for a prospective buyer but also being to show that person inside of the home they haven’t built yet. Imagine deciding to build a new home and being able to see your furniture and your family in the home. I know, seeing my children in one of the houses I was considering made me consider a larger home.

Linear innovation has conversations about incremental innovation. Not big bold change the world innovation but small improvements to what is already there. Consistent growth. Applied innovation takes what is there and goes in a different direction. Fleming wasn’t looking for a drug (Penicillin) he was researching something else. Penicillin was an applied innovation pattern and thank goodness he found it.

The next pattern and we will discuss them in great depth later in this book is linear — innovations owned by companies and people that build on other Innovations incrementally. The last pattern is exponential that explosive, sudden rapid innovation that is a game changer. That conversation is the one we remember. Those are the innovations that change the world around us forever. We all know the image of Steve Jobs[1] holding an iPhone on stage and changing the world of phones forever. With the exponential pattern conversation lies the context of history. When Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone the exponential conversation starter was “Watson come here, I need you.”

[1] Steve Jobs co-founder of Apple Computer. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZYlhShD2oQ

  • Did you know Charles Birdseye invented the frozen food packaging?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Did you know railroad companies invented refrigerators to move Ice?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Did you know there was once an ice harvesting industry in the world? When it stopped thousands of people lost their jobs.

    • Yes
    • No

What do you think?

16 points
Legend

Written by DocAndersen

I am a long time blogger and technology poster.I focus on what is possible, but I also try to see what is coming. In recent years I have been focused on sharing the memories of my family, as part of my Family History Project.

29 Comments

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    • It really is incredible. One of the things that AR would allow is a more immersive Xray experience for the Doctor.

      Not just seeing the problem, but seeing the problem the person is experiencing in the context of their body!

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