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Super diving in the kingdom of fjords

How does the Kingdom of Norway attract experienced and novice divers?

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Firstly, the desire to dive near the Lofoten Islands. There is a countless multitudes of picturesque inhabitants + interesting sunken ships in the depths there. And in January-February you can hang out with killer whales! Lots of them swim to the Lofoten Archipelago in order to regale delicious herring.

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Secondly, the opportunity to explore the well-preserved German steamer DS Frankenwald, which sank in 1940 in the waters near the coast of Gulen. The ship, safely covered by a narrow fjord, is quite well preserved. Visibility at this depth (about 40 meters) is excellent, but a bright flashlight/torch is needed due to the surrounding darkness. It is recommended to dive here only experienced divers, because the depth is rather big, and the water is very cool.

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Thirdly, waters off the coast of Kristiansand (Southern Norway). Here in 1945, was sunk by a German cargo ship, MV Seattle. Divers with extensive diving experience are allowed to dive and inspect the vessel, but all recommended safety measures must be observed. In 2010, two Danish divers were killed here (presumably due to the fact that they were hit by rotten overlaps of the ship).

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Wish the sharpest sensations? You can experience them when immersed in Saltstraumen (just not for the faint of heart!). The speed of this strong tidal current, it happens, reaches 26 knots, and whirlpools – as much as 12 meters in diameter. By the way, the underwater fauna living in such conditions is striking in its originality.

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Fans of exploration the sunken equipment from the Second World War should visit the surroundings of Narvik. The city was of great strategic importance for both Germany and Great Britain. Through the local harbor to other countries sent iron ore, which was mined in Sweden (Narvik and the Swedish city of Kiruna were connected with the railway).

Now people dive into the local waters to see the sunken cargo ships, warships and even a seaplane Dornier (became part of the seabed in 1945).

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P.S. Some video-bonuses:

№ 1 – dizzying diving in Saltstraumen

№ 2 – underwater flora & fauna of Saltstraumen

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