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Symbolisms of Purple ~ Color Crazy

Kim Johnson has started a Color Crazy Challenge. It is tons of fun. To see the simple rules you can click here Kim’s Color Crazy Challenge Week 5 Blue and Purple. Anyone is welcome to join.

The photo is one I snapped of one of my favorite snacks… M&M’s. There are a few purple ones in there, to follow along with the challenge.

I am writing something a little different again for Kim’s challenge. A lot of people choose purple as their favorite color. I decided to do a little research on this beautiful color. This is just a little of what I learned:

The purple in the U.S. military Purple Heart award represents courage. The Purple Heart is awarded to members of the United States armed forces who have been wounded in action.

In Thailand, purple is worn by a widow mourning her husband’s death.

In Tibet, amethyst is considered to be sacred to Buddha and rosaries are often fashioned from it.

A man with the rank of Roman Emperor was referred to as “The Purple” — a name that came from the color of the robe he wore.

In Japan, the color purple signifies wealth and position.

Purple was the royal color of the Caesars.

In pysanky, the traditional Ukrainian form of egg dying, purple speaks of fasting, faith, patience, and trust.

Purple denotes virtue and faith in Egypt.

In Tudor Britain, violet was the color of mourning, as well as the color of religious fervor.

Traditionally, in Iran, purple is a color of what is to come. A sun or moon that looks purple during an eclipse is an omen of bloodshed within the year.

Do you know of any other tradition, symbolism or custom in purple that you would like to add?

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Written by Carol DM

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  1. Purple was the color of divine, reserved for emperors only. That’s why, Byzantine empresses gave birth in a small palace which walls were plated with amethyst to ensure the purest right on the throne. Not all emperor and empresses wore title “porfirogenit” (born in purple), but those who did, was respected the most.

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