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Wander project Indianapolis Indiana

The first rule of the family history project is share pictures. The second rule is don’t change the pictures. That means if they are not sized properly or at catty whompus angles, they have to be shared as is. For many years I had some different camera phones. The early camera phones were frankly awful. 1 megapixel and even a 0.5-megapixel camera.  What was then is no longer now! Now you can buy a cellular phone with a 10 or 12-megapixel lens. It doesn’t solve the issue of the uncomfortable size and shape of the phone, and the resulting shaking. But the pictures are much better. The one’s today are from an old Pocket PC phone, circa 2005 or so. I wish they were better pictures.

There is a funny thing I did with every single cell phone I ever got. I took the same picture. The reason for that was to see if, in fact, the camera was that much better. I still do, although the subject of the picture has changed considerably. I try to take a comparable or similar picture every time I get a new cellular phone with a camera.

My next picture project remains taking the telescope outdoors and taking pictures of the night sky. By the time I remember that is my goal, I am usually so tired that it is better to crawl to bed and think about night pictures, tomorrow. Funny how time is the one thing we all cherish and it is the one thing that slips through our fingers no matter what we do.

Anyone, my apologies for the poor pictures. They are from a long time ago. For those who remember the days of really bad cell phone cameras, you now know why I don’t like using my cell phone as my primary camera. These pictures aren’t recoverable; they can’t be edited into a better format or shape. They are what the are. Images of long ago.

What do you think?

3 points
Legend

Written by DocAndersen

I am a long time blogger and technology poster.I focus on what is possible, but I also try to see what is coming. In recent years I have been focused on sharing the memories of my family, as part of my Family History Project.

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