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Sad Story: When, and why the bad guy sometimes wins.

George was an old man now.

He had spent most of his life living with his mother.

George never married.

Then, his mother died.

George stayed living in his mother’s house.

His brothers, though, wanted their share of their mother’s estate.

They banded together, and sold the house. This was easy for them to do, as the eldest brother was the executor.

George had to look elsewhere to live.

George, on his park bench.

George knew this neighbourhood well.

He had lived there all his life, so far, of 77 years of age. His mother had been 92, when she died.

George knew another old man who lived a few doors down the street from George’s mother’s house.

This man, Bob, told George, that he could come and live with him, in his otherwise empty house.

Bob’s wife had died, five years earlier.

He was living alone now. Bob was 85, and he told George that he would love to have some company.

George moved in, and Bob and himself got on very well together, until Harold, Bob’s son, told George that he was taking advantage of his old father.

Bob did let George pay all his bills, and buy the food for them.

Bob trusted his old friend completely.

“Get out from this house now,” Harold told him.

Instead though, Bob told his son to get out of his house.

He had gotten very upset with his son, and he literally screamed this to his son.

Unfortunately, getting so riled up like this, Bob had a massive stroke, and he keeled over dead.

George had to leave right away.

But when the will was found, a few weeks later, it was found now that the old man’s house had been left to George. His son had been disinherited.

George had a home again.

The son was a nasty piece of work though, and he wanted his revenge.

 Harold, a bad guy, of the worst type

One night, he broke into the house to make it look like a burglary, and he set fire to the house, and poor George burnt to death in the fire.

Harold got the house back again. He was the only living relative of Bob, and the insurance covered all the costs of the rebuild.

Nothing untoward was ever suspected.

Sometimes, the bad guy seems to win, as Harold did here.

Why does the bad guy sometimes seem to win?

In life, apparent wins along the way do not mean that you win in the end. 

Love wins over evil, but an evil-doer wins over love, when love has other reasons, behind the apparent loss.

Here, George was ready to meet his mother again.

Photo Credit: The photos used in this article were all sourced from the free media site, pixabay.com

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Written by The Dunce

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19 Comments

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  1. we could argue this story on many levels.

    The concept of bad or evil is created by the brothers. Those who had moved on, those that no longer was connected to what was.

    then a great good as the neighbor invited him to share a life.

    But we end with the greatest evil. The taking of a life.
    life is lost, but life stolen is the worst.

    1
    • Thanks, for your constructive comments. I like to write so that it can be thought about from many levels, so I have achieved my aim here then too.

      Yes, not a good ending, unless you believe in the afterlife.

      It will truly be a great reunion between George, and his mother again, if you do believe in life after death, that is.

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        • I guess it’s very hard to prove anything to oneself, but we all have our own individual experiences that tend to mould our own thinking a bit.

          Nothing seems conclusive though, and so, even experiences that seem to be very real, might have other explanations than the one that we are giving to them right now.

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          • a guru (he had to be on top of the mountain right?) once was asked. Which is greater life or death?

            the guru paused and said.
            neither
            it is the time in between that we determine the impact of both.

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        • The reply button has disappeared from your latest comment, so I will answer it here:

          I like what the guru said, and yet how can one short life be so important, given that we come from infinity, and go back to infinity, that is, if there is life after death?

          The now is neither dead or alive, it is just the now, of which life or death are mere labels.

          Live life now, and let death take care of itself, is always my answer to these types of questions.

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          • that happens when the thread gets too deep, (reply button going way) it is a good thing in the long run, it means you have had a wonderfully long conversation!!!

            the concept of the now is one that interests me. First that the now is real. we could argue that we are, as Dr. Suess said, living on a snowflake flowing through the air. Our eternity, could, in fact, be 24 hours in the life of the creature trudging with a snow shovel to clear our civilization off the driveway.

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          • Any yet, if I create a new thread of comments, like this, I get a point for this, it must see me as being a new poster, or something.

            I am not convinced about the now either really; it is something that sounds rather mythical to me, like the point in mathematics, it is defined, but it never sort of really exists in real life, in a way, to me.

            The “now” is as elusive, as the future, or the past. It is hard to put our finger on this now, and grasp any of it, for what it really might be, or not be.

    • Thanks for commenting here. I made it sadly tragic on purpose. As I was in a melancholy mood myself when I wrote this.

      Yes, if the law of Karma/ retribution / law of cause and effect/ what you sow you reap/ etc is true, he will get some type of a comeuppance, in the end.

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    • Yes, we have to win in the “right” way too, as sometimes such small wins only appear to be wins, at that time, but in the end, they will turn out to be the “albatross” that is still hanging around our necks, at the end, of our life journey.

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