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Day 2 of Winter Olympics 2018, Part 2

Sunday, 2.11.18

During the men’s figure skating competition, Tara and Johnny state that women figure skaters have been doing better than the men because the men have been struggling. During the 2nd day of the men’s figure skating, five men will compete. I didn’t even watch the first day because I didn’t know when it was on. OAR’s Kolyada fell. He skated well, but he also messed up. He probably scored high during the first day of competition because he made it to 2nd place with 173.57 points. Italy’s Rizzo skated well but her received 156.11, which might indicate he is a newcomer or he didn’t do well during the first day. USA’s Adam Rippon makes it to 2nd place with 172.98, and he talks about his struggles to finally being able to compete in the Olympics. He adds that it was worth the hardships. Canada’s Patrick Chan makes it to 1st place with 179.75 and Japan’s Tanaka makes it to 5th place with 148.36 points. So, the top 5 are Canada, OAR, USA, Italy, and Japan.

Women’s Figure Skating Free Skate involved five figure skaters. USA’s Nagasu is in 1st place with 137.53, followed by Japan’s Sakamoto with score of 131.91 points. Canada’s Daleman received 137.14, which put her in 2nd place. Italy’s 31-year-old Carolina Kostner makes it to 3rd place with 134.00 points. And, OAR-Russia’s 15-year-old Zagitova wows everyone with her performs, which gives her 158.08 points and puts her in 1st place. So, the top three are OAR, USA, and Canada.

Figure Skating Free Dance involved five pairs. It is the last part for the Team Skating competition, in which the five pairs will now compete for a medal. Japan’s Muramoto/Reed skated well but the guy fell, which gave them 87.88 points. Italy’s Cappellini/Lanotte received 107.00, while OAR’s Bobrova/Soloviyev performed a nice program but received 110.43. USA’s Shibutani siblings, Alex and Miai, performed a very flowy dance that looked dreamy because it appeared they were dancing on cloud 9. They received 112.01 points. Canada’s Virtue/Moir performed a dramatic program, and they received 118.10 points. The top three are Canada, USA, and OAR. But it is calculated with overall team scores.

TEAM CANADA wins Gold, TEAM OAR—Russia wins Silver, and TEAM USA wins Bronze.

At 8:30 pm, I watched the women’s Snowboarding halfpipe, which involved two runs. After each snowboarder performed two runs, they used their higher score. Japan’s Matsumoto scored better during Run 2 with 84.25, Spain’s Mastro scored better in Run 1 with 71.50, and France’s Thovex scored better in Run 2 with 64.25. USA’s Chloe Kim scored better in Run 2 with 95.50, USA’s Kelly Clark scored better in Run 2 with 63.25, and USA’s Mastro scored better in Run 1 with 83.75 points. USA’s Arielle Gold scored better in Run 2 with 62.75, while China’s Cai scored better in Run 2 with 69 and China’s Lui scored better in Run 1 with 87.75 points. Japan’s Tomita scored better in Run 2 with 66.50. Australia’s Crawford received 57.50 points. France’s Rodriguez scored better in Run 1 with 65, and Australia’s Arthur scored better in Run 2 with 66.50 points. Therefore, the top 10, as well as the other competitors who scored lower, include USA’s Chloe Kim, China’s Liu Jiayu, Japan’s Haruna Matsumoto, USA’s Maddie Mastro, Spain’s Queralt Castellet, China’s Cai Xuetong, Japan’s Sena Tomita, Australia’s Emily Arthur, France’s Sophie Rodriguez, France’s Mirabelle Thovex, USA’s Kelly Clark, USA’s Arielle Gold, Australia’s Holly Crawford, Switzerland’s Verena Rohrer, Japan’s Kurumi Imai, China’s Qiu Leng, Japan’s Hikaru Oe, Canada’s Mercedes Nicoll, Canada’s Elizabeth Hosking, Korea’s Kwon Sun-Oo, Slovenia’s Kaja Verdnik, China’s Li Shuang, Canada’s Calynn Irwin, and France’s Clemence Grimal.

Women’s Slope Style Final involved two runs. Heavy winds messed with their performance, and many girls fell, which resulted in lower scores. But, still, some of the girls scored low on both runs because they struggled with the heavy winds.

Czech’s Sarka Pancochova scored better in the first run with 43.46.

France’s Lucile Lefevre scored better in the first run with 28.35.

Slovakia’s Klaudia Medlova scored better in the second run with 34.

Switzerland’s Carla Somaini scored better in first run with 36.71.

Japan’s Asami Hirono scored better in the first run with 49.80.

Germany’s Silvia Mittermueller scored 1.00 in the first run and she didn’t show up for the second run.

Netherland’s Cheryl Maas scored better in the second run with 35.30.

OAR-Russia’s Sofya Fyodorova scored better in the second run with 65.73.

USA’s Jessika Jensen scored better in the first run with 72.76.

Switzerland’s Elena Konz scored better in the second run with 59.

Switzerland’s Sina Candrian scored better in the first run with 66.35.

Switzerland’s Isabel Derungs scored better in the first run with 39.66.

Japan’s Yuka Fujimori scored better in the first run with 63.73.

Great Britain’s Aimee Fuller scored better in the second run with 41.43.

Norway’s Silje Norendal scored better in the first run with 73.91.

Japan’s Reira Iwabuchi scored better in the first run with 48.33.

Canada’s Brooke Voigt scored better in the second run with 36.61.

Japan’s Miyabi Onitsuka scored better in the second run with 39.55.

USA’s Hailey Langland scored better in the second run with 71.80.

Canada’s Laurie Blouin scored better in the second run with 76.33.

New Zealand’s Zoi Sadowski-Synnott scored better in the second run with 48.38.

Finland’s Enni Rukajarvi scored better in the second run with 75.38.

Canada’s Spencer O’Brien scored better in the second run with 36.45.

Austria’s Anna Gasser scored better in the second run with 46.56.

USA’s Julia Marino scored better in the first run with 55.85.

USA’s Jamie Anderson scored better in the first run with 83.

The top 10 scores with in the 80s, 70s and 60s, and they included, USA’s Jamie Anderson, Canada’s Laurie Blouin, Finland’s Enni Rukajarvi, Norway’s Silje Norendal, USA’s Jessika Jensen, USA’s Hailey Langland, Switzerland’s Sina Candrian, OAR-Russia’s Sofya Fyodorova, Japan’s Yuka Fujimori, and Switzerland’s Elena Konz.

USA’s Jamie Anderson wins Gold, Canada’s Laurie Blouin wins Silver, and Finland’s Enni Rukajarvi wins Bronze

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