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hELLo…

The world is getting smaller, thanks to the internet. Like it or not, we definitely have to interact with someone who is not from our race, region or country; and who does not speak the same language or practice the same custom as us. In order to co-exist peacefully together, we need to understand their language, custom and religion as not to hurt their feelings unintentionally.

Let’s test our knowledge on how to say “Hello” in some languages.

  • Question /

    “Ni hao” is hello in

    • Japanese
    • Chinese
    • Malay
  • Question /

    The Germans say hello as

    • Ola
    • Guten tag
    • Ciao
  • Question /

    Hola, Saludes, Buenos dias are expressions said by which speaker

    • Spanish
    • Italian
    • Portuguese
  • Question /

    Vanakkam is hello in

    • Hindi
    • Tamil
    • Thai
  • Question /

    In the Philippines, people say hello as

    • Salam
    • Annyeong
    • Halo
  • Question /

    Ciao means hello in

    • Italian
    • Portuguese
    • Chinese
  • Question /

    Koreans greet people by saying

    • annyeonghaseyo
    • konnichiwa
    • namaste
  • Question /

    Ola is hello in what language?

    • Portuguese
    • Malay
    • Thai
  • Question /

    Konnichiwa is a greeting spoken by the

    • Malays
    • Japanese
    • Thais
  • Question /

    Namaste means hello in

    • Hindi
    • Malay
    • Vietnamese

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What do you think?

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Written by Watashiwa Rozana

Smarty PantsLoyal BuddyWordsmith BuddyBookwormYears Of MembershipGallery Maker

36 Comments

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  1. Got 1 mistake…I think Philippines is sometimes the same as “halo”….Halo means “mix” in Philippine language called Tagalog…And we have this famous dessert called “halo-halo” where there is a crushed mix with banana tidbits, milk, white beans, flakes, ice cream, leche flan, cassava tidbits, gelatin, etc…It’s every Filipino’s dessert during summer against the scorching heat.. 🙂

    • Yes, being able to speak a few words in their native language means a lot to people you are interacting with. I learned this when I went to Korea early this year. You can see their attitude towards you changes when you greet them in their language. I can’t speak Korean. The only words I knew, I picked-up from watching K-dramas. I always thought that I could survive if I can speak in English since English is an international language. I assume almost everyone can converse in English. But I am definitely wrong. Some may understand English, but to speak, is a different matter. The conversation we had there were like cats talking to dogs; they were talking in Korean while we were talking in English with many misunderstanding in between, which luckily were resolved.

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