in

A Little Bit Of History

Boston, Massachusetts.           I first discovered Boston’s historic Union Oyster House during the summer of 1977. From August 6th through 9th I participated in a 72 hour vigil at Faneuil Hall commemorating the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and calling for an end to the nuclear arms race. Standing in front of the cradle of Boston’s Independence movement, I held banners with 200 Mobilization For Survival activists calling for freedom from nuclear terror. We engaged in public education, street theater, and grass roots organizing. Standing in this historic area holding an anti-nuclear sign, a met a young woman in colonial dress. She was  holding a placard advertising one of America’s oldest still operating restaurants, The Union Oyster House. My new friend Maria was working for mininum wage promoting a seafood establishment  that has been a landmark in Boston since 1826. In lighter moments we’d stand together saying “Stand for peace and sit for some awesome chowder!

What do you think?

5 points

4 Comments

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply