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The five strongest drinks in the world

It has been said that alcohol is the liquid that kills the living and preserves the dead. That is why many countries around the world have strict laws regarding the alcoholic strength of certain beverages, including Brazil, which does not allow beverages with a content above 60%. Even so, some manufacturers scattered across the globe defy legislation and even common sense and put on the market true potions that would topple the most fearless drinker. Check out the five strongest on the planet:

1. Everclear, the world’s strongest drink

Made in the United States, by the company Luxco, this species of drip gringa (or spirit, as it is called, a drink made of cereals and without any taste) has an alcoholic graduation between 75,5% and incredible 95%. Just so you have an idea, a good Brazilian cachaça has around 44%. Forbidden almost everywhere in the US, the most powerful version can be purchased in the province of Alberta Canada, and is especially used as a supplement for drinks, making some dishes in the kitchen and even lighting fires.

2. Utopias, a beer to take down anyone

Manufactured by Samuel Adams, Utopias has 25% alcohol in its composition (usually a “breja” varies between 4.5% and 5%). In other words, with two glasses you are already totally drunk. Aged in barrels typically used for cognacs, whiskeys and port wine, it was only launched in 2002, 2005 and 2007, with limited production in 8000 bottles and originally sold at $ 100 each. Today, at auctions and specialized websites, each of these rarities can reach $ 500. Presented in a ceramic bottle, which, incidentally, is produced in Brazil, is a beer considered atypical with a complex taste and closer to a brandy or sherry.

3. Balkan, the vodka with contraindication

Balkan, as the name says, comes from the Balkans, more specifically from Bulgaria, began to be sold in England in 2002 and became an absolute success. With an alcoholic content of 88%, triple distilled, has on its label nothing more, no less than 13 warnings regarding possible harm to the health of the drinker. For this reason it is advisable not to drink it purely but as a component of drinks. Each bottle, with an extremely simple design and emulating the style of old drinks, comes out around 45 pounds or $ 137.

4. Absinthe, the green fairy

The absinthe called suisse has an alcoholic content ranging from 68% to 72%, but its sale is strictly prohibited in Brazilian lands (only the ordinaire version with graduation of around 45% is released). It turns out that it is not just the alcohol that makes the favorite drink of the French bohemians, like the painter Toulouse-Lautrec and the poets Rimbaud and Baudelaire, so famous and feared. Its composition of herbs, especially Artemisia absinthium or Losna, as it is commonly known in Brazil (that same of the famous tea for stomach pain) has potent effects and the abuse can cause convulsions, hallucinations and psychotic outbreaks, as well as permanent brain damage (which would explain the follies of the painter Van Gogh). In time, the vermouth also has mucus in its composition.

5. The strongest whiskey to be made

This has not yet come, but the promise has been on the air since 2006 when the Scottish Bruichladdich distillery promised to make 5,000 bottles of a 92% alcohol whiskey. In fact, the company is relying on a 1695 book to produce the drink, called the Usquebaugh-Baul epoch, which was distilled four times (a traditional Scotch malt passes only twice in the process while Irish is triple distilled) . The interesting thing is that the author of the book says that only two tablespoons of the potion are recommendable to a human being since, if he exceeds that amount “the breathing is interrupted and causes damage to the life of the individual.”

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Written by Natanael Genoel

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  1. This is fascinating stuff. The only one of this list I had heard of is absinthe. I have never seen it anywhere, only ever heard of it – it is banned in Britain, for obvious reasons. I wouldn’t mind trying just a little sip of it though!

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