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The source of information is important…

I am a long time CrowdFunding fan. I have funded many projects. One of them was the Keecker shown in the picture today. There are many other projects I’ve backed over the years. So many that I am normally listed as a superbacker. That means I have been part of 100 or more campaigns. Campaigns fail, it is after advanced technology that I tend to back. Some arrive, like Keecker, Loomo and others exceeding expectations. Some arrive, and I wonder why did I back it. Some never arrive at all, the ambition of the project greater than the ability of the delivery. Over the years I’ve found a 21% failure rate for Indigogo campaigns and roughly an 8% failure rate on Kickstarter.

Look crowdfunding is a risk. If you choose to back a campaign, you are making that choice. When you are a superbacker, and you put forth negative information about a campaign it has a bigger impact than a first time or second-time backer. The higher you are up in the system, the more you have to measure what you say. I don’t often post critiques of campaigns starting well, I’ve backed 20 campaigns like this, and they all did this. There is no value in that type of feedback. What I do is what I used to do and still do when it comes to software problems. You see no matter how good a developer is; there are always issues with the software. The reality of combination always bites you.

I was at an Automobile Manufacturer with a VP from the company I was working at, talking to the CIO of the company about embracing our software. The CIO looked at us and “Do you developers write software as the Admin of their box (that is the highest authority you can have on a computer, you can make all changes).” Our VP said “yes.” The CIO said that is why we can’t buy your software; you don’t build it the way we use it.

I learned a valuable lesson that day. The first is, be careful what you say. You may not like the answer you get back. The other thing I learned is the importance of being honest and making sure you share the right information. The other side of that equation is that you share both sides. The VP went back to the company HQ and changed how developers built the software going forward. The influence of a CIO of a major company, being frustrated was enough to make major changes. But I want to point out that most of that meeting was very positive. The CIO also, once the change was made on our side, deployed our software and gave us a great reference.

Positive about us, because we listened to the CIO’s problems and acted positively.

I do not trust anyone that only posts negative information about a topic or group. They are not telling the whole story and that is wrong.

  • Do you mislead by omission?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Do you mentor people?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Would you ever berate a Mentee and then end then walk away?

    • Yes
    • No
  • If you have a place of importance does it matter what you say to those below you?

    • Yes
    • No

What do you think?

7 points
Legend

Written by DocAndersen

I am a long time blogger and technology poster.I focus on what is possible, but I also try to see what is coming. In recent years I have been focused on sharing the memories of my family, as part of my Family History Project.

34 Comments

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  1. Users voted 4 times.
    Q: DO YOU MISLEAD BY OMISSION?
    Yes (1 votes) – 25%
    No (3 votes) – 75%
    Q: DO YOU MENTOR PEOPLE?
    Yes (4 votes) – 80%
    No (1 votes) – 20%
    Q: WOULD YOU EVER BERATE A MENTEE AND THEN END THEN WALK AWAY?
    Yes (2 votes) – 50%
    No (2 votes) – 50%
    Q: IF YOU HAVE A PLACE OF IMPORTANCE DOES IT MATTER WHAT YOU SAY TO THOSE BELOW YOU?
    Yes (4 votes) – 100%

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