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The Beheaded Pirate Captain Blackbeard

To be fascinated by a tale of a notorious and dangerous pirate it is good to have a picture of him in your imagination. Captain Blackbeard was born as Edward Teach about 1680 in Bristol, England. He was tall, broad-shouldered, wore his dark hair long and had a long black beard. People recognized him by his wide-brimmed hat, long boots, and slings full of pistols slung across his body. When he was at battle what made him look dangerous and furious was that he attached lit fuses to his hair and slowly burned sparks and smoke were created. The things that made Captain Blackbeard different from many other pirates were that he could read and write which made people think he came from a wealthy family.

Captain Blackbeard commanded four ships and had a pirate army of 300 when he was at the top. In a sea-battle, he defeated the famous warship HMS “Scarborough”. He was known for clutching two swords, several knives and had pistols at the ready when he was doing battle.

<a rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" data-snax-placeholder="Source" class="snax-figure-source" href="https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/last-days-blackbeard-180949440/" target="_blank">https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/last-days-blackbeard-180949440/</a>

He was finally defeated by troops of the Royal Navy commanded under Lieutenant Robert Maynard on November 22, 1718, Blackbeard only stopped fighting after he had been shot five times and slashed about twenty times. Afterward, he was beheaded and his head was raised upon a stake to warn other pirates near Hampton River in Virginia. There is a legend that says his headless body swam around one of Lieutenant Maynard’s ships three times before it disappeared into the waters.

Captain Blackbeard has been portrayed in many different movies like “Blackbeard’s Ghost” and “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides”.

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  1. Fascinating stuff, Rasma! But isn’t it a little odd how we romanticise pirates from three centuries ago, while present-day pirates, such as those in the South China Sea, or near the Horn of Africa… well. there’s nothing remotely romantic about their behaviour. It’s amazing what the distance of a couple of centuries can achieve 🙂

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  2. i am a huge fan of pirate lore! I started watching Oak Island, the story of what is or isn’t buried on that island because of that!

    as always awesome information.

    May I ask the author what makes you pick the topics you cover?

  3. I have heard of piraes but not in such detail. I remeber when I had taken that cruise of the Bahamas the hotel where we ate they enacted this role. The pirates would just come there while we were eating.

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    • I have always wished I could stumble over a pirate treasure, Doc.I think when the weather gets better here where I live in Florida and I go to the beach again I’ll bring a shovel. Just have to think of a good story to tell the cops if they ask lol

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