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Heartache

This candy floss love where you are toothaches all over and they are the sweetest thing you’ve ever touched and your gums won’t stop bleeding. It’s not every day you meet someone with a sugar-cane heart and hands that only want to hold yours for hours instead of feeling you up. You think of them when you see pink but everything else you’ve ever loved has been dark red and smothering. They are lollipops and hard-boiled sweets you steal from corner shops, they are vanilla perfume and glossy lips and a white smile and you are drowning in the after-taste. They put three spoon-fulls of sugar into ice-cold water and tell you to drink, tell you it’ll make your heart soft again, and teach you what it’s like to feel warm with love again. They don’t know how your insides are already rotting. They don’t know how you’ve swallowed ants in past loves and they’re starting to wake up again. It’s summer again and you’re worried they’re starting to melt. You’ve always been told that sweet things turn bad when it gets hot and these days your hands won’t stop sweating. You’re too afraid to touch them and find all the soft pink residue under your nails, find parts of them in your hair and on your clothes and between your teeth. Maybe there are some loves you’re never supposed to taste if it means they get to stay sweet. Maybe there are some loves you’re never supposed to taste if it means you get to keep all of your teeth.

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3 points

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in

Heartache

Sadness is a natural response to loss, an emotional suffering that occurs when we lose someone we love. The greater the loss, the greater the sorrow, and the most intense in the case of the death of a loved one. PHASE OF TOUGH

  • Denial
  • Anger
  • Confidence
  • Acceptance
  • Adjusting the situation and reintegrating.

All people do not pass through all phases, and sometimes they do not come in this order because the sorrow is unpredictable and individual. What you have to remember is that it is normal to feel all these emotions and there is no fixed time within which they will disappear. The most difficult periods will eventually become less intense and shorter, but it is quite common for us to feel a bitter grief for years after losing, especially at the moments we wanted to share with a loved one.

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8 points

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  1. I lost my father more than thirty years ago. My father has been ill for the past few years, and as long as I see his suffering, I think that my family and I should be ready to accept if he died, but when that happens, however we feel ready, the reality of losing is sad.

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