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Fairytales of the Elvish Coin-Chapter 4: The Goblin

The Goblin

Once upon a time, locked away in a dark dungeon there lived a little goblin. He had never seen sunlight in his life and was given only a small shoe box to sleep in. He was owned by a cruel master who never let the goblin outside, no matter how much he pleaded. The master would visit him to bring chores like ironing, vegetable chopping and washing to do, but would never let him leave the dungeon. Should the goblin make any mistakes, the poor creature would be beaten with a rolling pin.

Each and every night when the goblin crawled into his shoe box, he would dismally sing himself to sleep:

“Oh to set a goblin free

Would make one so filled with glee!

And I wish I wish I wish the light

Would shine me a little luck tonight!”

But every night, his wish was ignored. One day, when his master came down to the dungeon to give the goblin vegetables to chop and clothes to wash, he held a hand to his heart and collapsed dead.

The little goblin was so shocked that he ran to his master and tried to shake him awake. But it was no use, for the cruel master was indeed dead. The goblin wept, for even as unfairly as he was treated, his master had been his only companion. When he had finally dried his eyes, he reached into his master’s pocket and pulled out a rusty golden key. He unlocked the metal cage doors of the dungeon and escaped at last.

Now the master had a large family and had many children that all lived away from home. So it did not take long for them to inherit his fortune. But the children of the master were even more horrid than their father, and the goblin was so frightened that he decided to leave the area before they arrived. He packed himself a small rag of bread and meat and threw it over his shoulder. As he left he sang to himself:

“Oh to set a goblin free

Would make one so filled with glee!

And I wish I wish I wish the light

Would shine me a little luck tonight!”

On this cold winter’s day, the goblin trekked for miles through the thick snow, battling through blizzards and slippery paths, passing under frozen waterfalls with icicles as sharp as spears.

He eventually stopped to rest on the lip of a wishing well and began to cry, for he was so cold and had no where to go. He was unaware that the son of his master had been following the goblin his whole journey, and was waiting for an opportunity to kill him, as revenge for running away and escaping his slavery duties to the family.

With watery grey eyes, the goblin looked deep down into the wishing well at the bronze and silver pennies and began to sing:

“Oh to set a goblin free

Would make one so filled with glee!

And I wish I wish I wish the light

Would shine me a little luck tonight!”

At that moment, the master’s son lunged out of the shadows and pushed the poor goblin into the well, where the creature fell with a loud thud. “That’ll teach you for running away, stupid goblin!” laughed the son.

The goblin stayed there shivering until dusk had passed and he could see the moon glowing down on him softly. To get more comfortable, the goblin pushed the coins aside. As he did this however, he noticed one coin in particular was gleaming at him. It was a whiter silver, and seemed much larger than all the others. When he held it and tilted it to the left, a gleam of gold shone and highlighted the inscription, which appeared to be an elvish crown. Not long after handling it, the goblin felt a strange change. A warmth and inner glow rushing through his whole body. Then appearing out of nowhere, black boots began to form on his feet, a woollen hat, a coat and mittens clothed his whole body and the small rag of food he was carrying turned into a huge buffet of chicken legs, fruits of the forest, cream, bread and honey. The goblin was astonished and began eating immediately. After he had eaten all the food and felt very full and satisfied, another helping of food appeared. As filling as this was, goblins had tremendously large appetites, so he ate the second meal. The food reappeared again, so the goblin ate a third, forth and fifth helping. After the sixth, he felt rather sick.

“Oh!” said the goblin, “this was so delicious but now I feel ill. I wish I could leave this wishing well!”

At that moment, a red step appeared before the goblin, and at the top of that step grew another. Then another, until hundreds of tiny steps spiralled around the walls of the wishing well, reaching right to the top.

The goblin put the coin in the pocket of his woolly coat and walked up the stairs.

For several months after that day, the goblin began to think himself very lucky indeed. He had used the riches the coin had given him to book himself into beautiful hotels all over the world and ate at magnificent restaurants.

However, as much as he enjoyed these comforts, a goblin’s true nature thrived in the dirtiest street corners where they enjoyed bad smells and rotten fish, and sometimes were found to be living in dustbins. The coin was giving the goblin another type of comfort, and one he found difficult to adjust to.

One day as he was on holiday in a land far far away from the confines of his dungeon, he met a lovely female goblin and they fell deeply in love. They enjoyed playing in the mud, swimming in the lakes and climbing trees. But like the little goblin, she did not care for fine restaurants or lavish hotels. So one morning at sunrise, the goblin took the coin and tossed it into the lake. Then he sang:

“Oh to set a goblin free

Has made one so filled with glee!

At last I can watch the stars alight

I have seen the sun , what a delight!”

He went back to marry the female goblin, and they lived happily ever after.

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