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Wacky Wednesday Challenge – "Pictures Don't Lie"

“Pictures don’t lie” used to be a very common expression that has gradually faded from common usage. It was great line in the old detective shows as someone drops a pile of photos on a desk. It was a game ender. And, it was true before digital photography democratized photos and photo processing. Now an image like the four eyed cat above isn’t that surprising when we see it. Our eyes do try to remedy it at first; but, simultaneously our brain knows what it is. It’s just another altered photo and we see lots of those. I couldn’t resist jazzing up my photo of a neighbors cat relaxing on a hot day. Yes, pictures do lie. They lie like rugs! Happy wacky Wednesday everyone.

© 2019 – Howard Faxon

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  1. I cannot believe I missed this double cat. Really fantastic photographic skill. I barely can take a picture with my smartphone. But to each his own. I will be looking forward to some more of your fantasmagoric pictures/photos…

  2. I am sorry for that. I have been a little cavalier in presenting this. You helped me realize just now that perhaps I am doing something that diminishes the openness and sensitivity with which people who love visual experience first glance at things. If it serves to desensitize the viewer to future experience then I should be more responsible. Sorry again; but also, thank you.

    • I copied the photo and put the copy on top of the original. I made the top layer roughly 50% opaque (transparent – the software uses “opacity”). I erase most of the top photo and start to reposition it a little bit upwards. I resized it a bit smaller and went back to full opacity on the top layer. I then erased with soft edges and positioned a touch more until it blended. This is horribly condensed but I would be happy to clarify what I can for you. I feel you would suss this out very quickly by trial and error. For some reason I think you had Pixelmator? If that is so then I could help you very specifically find the features that did this.

    • I am sorry for that. I have been a little cavalier in presenting this. You helped me realize just now that perhaps I am doing something that diminishes the openness and sensitivity with which people who love visual experience first glance at things. If it serves to desensitize the viewer to future experience then I should be more responsible. Sorry again; but also, thank you.

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