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Halloween Candy Through the Years

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_Ruth%20

In the 1920s the most popular candy bar was Baby Ruth which was a mix of peanuts, caramel, and chocolate-flavored nougat. Other candies were Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, Oh Henry! bars and Bit-O-Honey.

It is interesting to discover that the Baby Ruth candy bar also is mentioned in a song from 1956 titled “A Rose and a Baby Ruth”. I have put in the link for your enjoyment.

Among my favorites when I came along at the end of the 1950s were peanut butter cups and the Bit-O-Honey bars.

https://nowiknow.com/where-the-other-two-musketeers-went/

By the 1930s 3 Musketeers had been introduced in 1932 and came in three flavors chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry. That is the reason for the name of the candy bar. Other popular trick or treat candies that year were Snickers, candy buttons and Boston Baked Beans. I still remember eating the candy buttons from long paper streams.

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/538954280398794831/?lp=true

The 1940s came around and the favorite candies for trick or treaters were M&Ms which came on the market in 1941. Other candy favorites that year were Bazooka Bubble Gum, Jolly Ranchers, and Almond Joys.

I remember my mom telling me that she really enjoy Almond Joys and would purchase them often returning from work in Manhattan, New York City and loving the juicy coconut. Years later when mom was no longer working in the city I would buy an Almond Joy for her and she remembered how good it always tasted.

Bazooka Bubble Gum was a favorite of mine in the early 1960s when I liked seeing other children blowing those pink bubbles. Unfortunately, I could not learn how to blow bubbles. Then my darling dad took the time to learn how to blow those bubbles and he taught me. Kid you not. I was so glad and looked at my daddy as my hero. Afterward, this bubble gum became so popular that my dad often purchased them for me.

As a child, I remember loving the many flavors of Jolly Ranchers and my favorites were always sour apple and cherry.

I came into this world at the end of the 1950s so I do remember eating candy that was hot and cinnamon flavored. These were created in 1954. Other candies popular that decade were Necco Wafers, Satellite Wafers, and black-licorice flavored treats. I never liked black licorice I was a fan of the red.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SweeTarts

This was my decade the 1960s and in 1963 when I turned 5 I was finally a happy trick or treater. Among my most favorite candies was SweeTARTS which came in many delicious flavors. There was also Necco’s Banana Splits and banana Slap Stix.

Then there were more favorite fruity candy Mike & Ike, Pixy Stix, and Starburst. I was also glad to get pennies so I could buy more of my favorites. Those days were also still the days of penny candies.

https://www.candywarehouse.com/charms-cherry-blow-pops-48-piece-box/

In the 1970s the popular candy was Laffy Taffy, those fun popping rocks Pop Rock, fizzy ZotZ, Blow Pops a lolly and bubble gum combination and Fun Dip. My two favorites were Pop Rocks and Blow Pops.

https://www.influenster.com/reviews/skittles-original-fruit-candy

By the 1980s I was coming to an end at university and now I loved to dress up for Halloween and party in bars. Skittles came around in 1982 and I loved them. There were also Willie Wonka candies like Runts and Nerds.

Then fruity, chewy candies like gummy bears and others like Ring Pops and Sour Patch Kids.

Skittles never go out of style so we still have delightful commercials like this:

The 1990s brought along candy called AirHeads. Other popular brands were Baby Bottle Pops, Push Pops, and Bubble Gum Jugs. For those who preferred really sour candy, you had WarHeads.

https://www.partycity.com/extreme-sour-warheads-candy-175ct-178651.html

Let me tell you looking over this candy list boy, had times changed. I mean you can already see that we were all entering a completely different kind of world with candy that was called AirHeads and WarHeads.

What do you think?

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